Forgot my password and spam

On the topic this month about security and password, the discussion of lost passwords come to mind today. When you need to reset your password on your website, the most common thing it asks you for is your password.

pass1

Seems simple and harmless enough, but can it be a gateway for spam? You might thing not, but depending on how the website responds to the email address you put in, it might!

Some systems will reply in a clear way on if that account exists or not. For example, it might reply that the password will be emailed to you, or that the account doesn’t exist.

Think about that, what is the implication?

Simply that a malicious person can write a very basic script that will attempt to “password reset” random email addresses, and your response will verify if that email actually exists.

The threat here is a couple:

  1. First it gives a hacker specific knowledge that your account exists so it can try to brute force their way into your account;
  2. Instead of attempting to figure out your account, now I can simply send you a spoofed email saying you need to change your password at your-bank.com because, well I know you have an account there and it makes the attack that much more legitimate-sounding;
  3. Finally, it lets them sell your email address as a known good address, since obviously, you use it to access some online service.

 

For the end-user/consumer/professional, take a moment, see which websites leak your private email address. If they do, direct them to read this article so they can protect your privacy better.

For developers, this is a call to action to stop leaking this data accidentally. The preferred method is to simply say “if your account exists, we’ll send you a reset password”. That stops it dead in its tracks because that message goes to every email attempt. Also, be sure to check out this article about account security overall.

 

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